I-Search
shared by Ms. Noelle Gallant, Saco Middle School
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rubric code: WR-W99N

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  2
(strongest)
1 0
(weakest)
Analyze/Integrate Information (  )
paragraph-level
The response gives sufficient evidence of the ability to gather, analyze, and integrate information within and among multiple sources of information.
 
  • - You've taken several sources and put them together to support your ideas.
  • - I'm impressed with the way you've synthesized information from several sources.
The response gives limited evidence of the ability to gather, analyze, and integrate information within and among multiple sources of information.
 
  • - This is an area of improvement for you. You are in the beginning stages of synthesizing information from different sources, but you haven't fully argued your claims.
  • - In this paragraph, you've used the same source twice. Can you find a way to incorporate other sources, too? This is how to synthesize your information.
  • - You're using short, choppy paragraphs. Try combining paragraphs by topic to synthesize the information you found in your research.
  • - I'm impressed with the way you've synthesized information from your sources, but I wish I knew what sources you used. Parenthetical citations, please!
A response gets no credit if it provides no evidence of the ability to gather, analyze, and integrate information within and among multiple sources of information.
 
  • - This is a weakness. Each paragraph should cite at least two sources to show your ability to fully analyze and integrate those sources.
Evaluate Information/Sources
whole document
The response gives sufficient evidence of the ability to evaluate the credibility, completeness, relevancy, and/or accuracy of the information and sources.
 
  • - You found some great sources - especially interviews- to answer your questions.
  • - You found some really great sources to answer your questions!
The response gives limited evidence of the ability to evaluate the credibility, completeness, relevancy, and/or accuracy of the information and sources.
 
  • - This is an area of improvement for you. Did you use what we learned in class to evaluate your sources?
  • - Wiki sources are not reliable! Evaluate each source to make sure your information is from reliable sources.
A response gets no credit if it provides no evidence of the ability to evaluate the credibility, completeness, relevancy, and/or accuracy of the information and sources.
 
  • - I can't see what your sources are. You're missing parenthetical citations and/or Works Cited.
Use Evidence (  )
paragraph-level
The response gives sufficient evidence of the ability to cite evidence to support arguments and/or ideas.
 
  • - You've done a great job citing your sources and giving examples.
The response gives limited evidence of the ability to cite evidence to support arguments and/or ideas.
 
  • - I'm not sure you've included enough evidence to support your claims here.
  • - Again, not enough evidence.
  • - This is an area of improvement for you.
A response gets no credit if it provides no evidence of the ability to cite evidence to support arguments and/or ideas.
 
  • - Where are you getting your information here? Cite your sources!
  • - How does this evidence relate back to your thesis?
  • - You haven't used parenthetical citations here, so I don't know where you got your information.
  • - You've incorrectly used parenthetical citations.
Statement of Purpose/Focus
sentence-level
The response is fully sustained and consistently and purposefully focused
 
  • - You did a great job answering your research question!
The response is somewhat sustained and may have a minor drift in focus
 
  • - Your paper mostly focuses back to your research question. Remember, everything you include in your paper MUST relate to your thesis.
  • - I'm not seeing your research question stated as a thesis here.
  • - You've plopped your research question in the middle without really explaining how you came up with the question.
A response gets no credit if it provides no evidence of the ability to maintain focus.
 
  • - You've listed several questions, but I don't see your research question here. Am I missing it?
  • - I don't see your research question here. Your introduction does not seem to relate to the research, and it's distracting from your paper.
Organization
whole document
The response has a clear and effective organizational structure creating unity and completeness
 
  • - You did a great job of organizing your thoughts for this assignment.
The response has an inconsistent organizational structure, and flaws are evident
 
  • - You've included the required sections of the paper, but your paragraph organization is inconsistent.
  • - You have giant, disorganized paragraph here. How can you separate each paragraph by topic?
  • - You have short, choppy paragraphs that make your work a bit harder to read. How could you combine these paragraphs for a smoother read?
  • - Some of your paragraphs are disorganized. The ideas don't all match. Each paragraph should have one focus.
  • - You have all the required parts of the paper, but you haven't included the required headings "Story of my Search", "Results of My Search", "Reflection on my Search".
A response gets no credit if it provides no evidence of the ability to create and maintain organization
 
  • - You haven't included all of the required sections of the paper.
  • - Your paper is far too short to meet the expectation of the assignment.
Language and Vocabulary
whole document
The response clearly and effectively expresses ideas, using precise language
 
  • - This paper is strong - it reads like a high school level paper. Great job!
  • - This is a strength for you!
The response expresses ideas unevenly, using simplistic language
 
  • - This is an area where you are growing!
A response gets no credit if it provides no evidence of the ability to clearly and effectively expresses ideas, using precise language
 
  • - Limited vocabulary and language.
Conventions
whole document
The response demonstrates a strong command of conventions
 
  • - Highly revised and error-free. Well done!
The response demonstrates a partial command of conventions: frequent errors in usage may obscure meaning
 
  • - a few errors here and there
A response gets no credit if it provides no evidence of the ability to demonstrate a strong command of conventions
 
  • - your wording is strong, but your errors distract from your writing
  • - Distracting errors.


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