Research in History/Science/Technical Subjects
shared by Patricia Sarles
  Common Core-aligned rubric
9-10th Grade
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rubric code: 8U-59BB

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  Below 9-10th
(weakest)
Beginning Emerging Proficient Above 9-10th
(strongest)
Thesis
sentence-level
W.9-10.9
Writing: Research to Build and Present Knowledge
Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
Introduction (  )
paragraph-level
W.9-10.1a
Writing: Text Types and Purposes: Argumentative Writing
Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
Multiple Credible Sources
sentence-level
WHST.9-10.8
Writing (Hist/SS, Sci&Tech): Research to Build and Present Knowledge
Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.
Integrate & Cite Sources
sentence-level
WHST.9-10.8
Writing (Hist/SS, Sci&Tech): Research to Build and Present Knowledge
Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.
Overall Organization (  )
paragraph-level
W.9-10.1a
Writing: Text Types and Purposes: Argumentative Writing
Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.


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