District 219 Writing Rubric
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  Common Core-aligned rubric
9-10th Grade
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rubric code: B9-5KJX

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  Below 9-10th
(weakest)
Beginning Emerging Proficient Above 9-10th
(strongest)
Thesis
sentence-level
W.9-10.1a
Writing: Text Types and Purposes: Argumentative Writing
Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
Develops no viable point of view or is vague or seriously limited.
 
  • - Is this your thesis? I don't really see an argument here. A thesis has to be debatable; this sounds to me like it's just a fact.
Develops a thesis.
 
  • - I can see what you're getting at here, but you need to be much clearer about what you're arguing.
Develops an arguable thesis.
 
Effectively develops an arguable thesis.
 
Effectively and insightfully develops an arguable thesis.
 
Develop Claims (  )
paragraph-level
W.9-10.1b
Writing: Text Types and Purposes: Argumentative Writing
Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience's knowledge level and concerns.
Develops no viable point of view or claims are vague or seriously limited and demonstrates weak critical thinking or provides little or no reasoning to support its position.
 
  • - Holy cow, I couldn't follow this at all. Let's talk.
Develops inconsistent claims on the issue and demonstrates some critical thinking, but may do so inconsistently.
 
  • - This is a bit disjointed. I think you need to take a step back and think about what you're trying to argue in this paragraph.
Develops claims on the issue and demonstrates competent critical thinking.
 
Effectively develops related claims on the issue and demonstrates strong critical thinking.
 
  • - Nice job developing this point and relating it back to your argument as a whole. Fairly compelling.
Effectively and insightfully develops strong claim(s) on the issue and demonstrates outstanding critical thinking.
 
Supporting Evidence & Sources
sentence-level
W.9-10.1b
Writing: Text Types and Purposes: Argumentative Writing
Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience's knowledge level and concerns.
Provides inappropriate or insufficient examples, evidence, and reasoning to support its position or little or no evidence.
 
  • - I don't think this piece of evidence says what you're claiming it says.
  • - Need evidence here. This won't be convincing without it.
Uses inadequate examples, evidence, or reasoning to support its position.
 
  • - Evidence "splat" - this is decent evidence but you have to explain to your reader why it's important. You can't just splat it on the page and move on.
Uses adequate examples, evidence, and reasoning to support its position.
 
Uses appropriate examples, evidence, and reasoning to support its position.
 
Uses clearly appropriate examples, evidence, and reasoning to support its position.
 
  • - Excellent choice of evidence here and I love how you discuss its significance to your overall argument. Well done!
Transitions/Links
sentence-level
W.9-10.1c
Writing: Text Types and Purposes: Argumentative Writing
Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.
Demonstrates serious problems with coherence or progression of ideas within and between paragraphs or is disjointed or incoherent.
 
  • - Uh, this is jarring. You have to ease us into the next part of your discussion, give us some flow from one paragraph to the next.
May demonstrate some lapses in coherence or progression of ideas within and between paragraphs.
 
  • - Yes, it's a transition, but so cliche. Let's aim higher, shall we?!
Demonstrates some coherence and progression of ideas both within and between paragraphs.
 
Demonstrates sufficient coherence and progression of ideas both within and between paragraphs.
 
  • - Nicely done! I'm ready to flow into your next point!
Demonstrates clear coherence and smooth progression of ideas both within and between paragraphs.
 
Overall Organization
whole document
W.9-10.1a
Writing: Text Types and Purposes: Argumentative Writing
Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
Is poorly organized and/or focused, or demonstrates serious problems with coherence or progression of ideas or is disjointed or incoherent.
 
  • - Outlines are your friend. We'll talk in class.
May be simplistic in its organization or focus; may demonstrate some lapses in coherence or progression of ideas.
 
Is generally organized and focused, demonstrating some coherence and progression of ideas.
 
  • - Once you tighten up each of the body paragraphs, I think your overall organization will become more apparent.
Is well organized and focused, demonstrating sufficient coherence and progression of ideas.
 
  • - Pretty good organization, argument logically flows from one point to the next.
Is well organized and clearly focused, demonstrating clear coherence and smooth progression of ideas.
 
  • - This was quite elegant. The development and progression of your argument was a thing of beauty!
Precise Language & Jargon
whole document
W.9-10.2d
Writing: Text Types and Purposes: Explanatory/Informative Writing
Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic.
Displays very little facility in the use of language, using very limited vocabulary or incorrect word choice or is fundamentally limited or incorrect in its vocabulary or word choice.
 
Display developing facility in the use of language, sometimes using simplistic vocabulary or making errors in word choice.
 
Exhibits adequate facility in the use of language, using generally appropriate vocabulary.
 
Exhibits reasonable facility in the use of language, using appropriate vocabulary.
 
Exhibits skillful use of language, using a varied, accurate, and apt vocabulary.
 
Sentence Structure
whole document
May demonstrate severe flaws in sentence structure that impede meaning.
 
May lack variety or demonstrate problems in sentence structure.
 
Demonstrates some variety in sentence structure.
 
Demonstrates reasonable variety in sentence structure.
 
Demonstrates meaningful variety in sentence structure.
 
Mechanics and Usage
whole document
May contain errors in grammar, usage, and mechanics so serious that meaning is somewhat unclear or is unclear.
 
May contain an accumulation of errors in grammar, usage, and mechanics, but these do not seriously impede meaning.
 
Has some errors in grammar, usage, and mechanics, but these do not impede meaning.
 
Is generally free of most errors in grammar, usage, and mechanics.
 
Is free of most errors in grammar, usage, and mechanics.
 


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